22 Jan

Crystal Rain relaunched in trade paperback this week. Read the first 1/3 free right here

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Crystal Rain launches this week in a brand new trade paperback format.

If you’re interested in diverse SF, if you’re interested in seeing what a taste of the Caribbean is like when it’s married with adventure SF, if you’re interested in reading the book that launched the Xenowealth series, then here you go.

A lot of people have taken a closer look at the book with the new cover. A lot of people have told me ‘oh, I didn’t realize it was SF.’

It is.

But don’t take my word for it. Read the first entire third of the book and see for yourself.

That’s my advertisement right there. Please link the sampler. Please link the post. If you’re interested in a broader SF, if you’re interested in something outside the usual, then take a bite. A third of a whole book is enough for you to decide if it is your thing.

All without having to drop a single dime.

Try it.

No, seriously, try it.

Legends say that the forefathers of Nanagada fled a far-off star to their new home. They say that the sky once hummed with metal flying machines and palatial floating cities. But then the Azteca came. Created and driven by cruel, inhuman gods they swarmed out of the sky in search of sacrificial blood, and worse. To defeat them and their gods the forefathers burned the sky. The cities and machines fell to the ground, useless.

In the centuries since, Azteca have kept to their side of the mountains in an uneasy truce. But now it has been broken. Driven forward by their gods once again, only one man can stop their bloodthirsty march: John deBrun. His family scattered, John holds the key to an ancient secret deep in memories lost just before he was dragged unconscious from the sea years ago…

…if he can stay alive long enough to uncover them, he might be able to stop the destruction of Nanagada.

And here a few reviews, if you’re still not convinced:

“Buckell’s promising debut. …a twist that adds a sci-fi edge to this tale’s mythological underpinnings.” Philadelphia Inquirer

“Buckell does a nice job of setting the stage and the pages turn quickly. I’m still on board for Volume Two. The possibilities for the series are tantalizing.” Contra Costa Times

“…[A] promising debut. It’s a twist that adds a sci-fi edge to this tale’s mythological underpinnings.” Kansas City Star

“Buckell does a fairly smooth job unwrapping the plot.” Tampa Bay Tribune

“Readers who like sieges, strategies and swashbuckling heroes will thoroughly enjoy this fast-moving tale.” Cleveland Plain Dealer

“A fast-moving and thoroughly enjoyable tale that kept me reading almost non-stop.” Midwest Book Review

“In this stellar debut, Buckell has created an amazing world. The plot is well-constructed and the writing is simply superb, particularly the dialogue, which is amazingly beautiful.” Romantic Times

“Enjoyable…for a first-timer Buckell handles his interlocking narratives well and his characters retain their humanity.” Publishers Weekly

“Buckell’s debut captures the flavor of Afro-Caribbean culture in the lilting dialog of his characters and in their customs. An original tale with distinctive characters and a fresh approach to worldbuilding, this sf quest belongs in most libraries.” Library Journal (Starred Review)

“Buckell’s first novel conjures a vividly imagined world, spiced with intrigue and adventure that unfolds at a breakneck pace.” Booklist

“An auspicious debut. Buckell’s done what a first novelist needs to do: to make us want to know about his world, and more about his imagination. His announced next novel, Ragamuffin, is certainly worth looking forward to.” Locus

“A good old SF adventure story. His Creole background lends a colorful touch to his characters and dialogue, and his clever reworking of familiar tropes makes this a standout first novel.” Locus (Short review)

“Crystal Rain is a totally engrossing, can’t-put-it-down reading experience. The setting is superb, the characters are fascinating and DeBrun, the enigmatic Pepper and the conflicted Oaxyctl are one of the great fictional triumvirates. This is lush SF adventure in the C.L. Moore vein. Hopefully more installments are on the way.” Starlog

“Even non-sci-fi readers will be bowled over by…Tobias Buckell’s Crystal Rain… Violent, poetic and compulsively readable.” Maclean’s (Canada)

“A pepperpot of a delectable, enjoyable story…Buckell is a deft, assured storyteller who will, hopefully, continue to publish novel-length fiction with the same eye for intricate setting and rounded characterization he’s exhibited here in his debut novel.” SFF World

“Infused with new life and excitement. Buckell’s plotting is sturdy and swift with nary a longuer. For a thrilling adventure set on a unique world, this book couldn’t be bettered.” SciFi.com (Paul Di Filippo)

“A fast-paced pulp-style adventure … a very satisfying first novel with a different and refreshing setting.” Emerald City

“There’s a great old-school pulp-adventure essence to Crystal Rain … what Buckell does right, I’m happy to say he does breathtakingly right. Most effective is the evocation of place. His setting feels alive. There is real texture to Nanagada, its people, villages, back alleys and crowded markets. You can almost feel the humidity. Buckell’s use of the sea as a critical setting is brilliantly handled, too…I can definitely say that there’s nothing else on the racks right at this moment quite like it, and that Tobias Buckell is a name to add to you ‘watch this writer’ list.” SFReviews.net

“[Buckell’s] first novel, CRYSTAL RAIN, is the sort of thing that will have readers watching for more. [He] has displayed a gift for imagination much greater than one book can hold. Sequels would surely please many readers, but if he imagines as thoroughly in new and unconnected novels, they too will please.” Analog

“The hard part [of writing a novel] is a combination of fast pace with some glossy writing and intriguing characters. And I’ve noticed that this is a skill that science fiction writers are picking up. Case in point: the debut novel from Tobias S. Buckell, Crystal Rain.”

“I was actually quite surprised at how fast-paced the book was. I was glad to see, however, that as I was burning through the story, Buckell got each moment and each twist and turn exactly right.”

“Buckell writes that stuff with panache, and there’s some remarkably strong science fiction in there too… [He] has way more atmosphere and colour in his story than an equivalent sf book… It takes a great deal of care to create something so balanced.”

“This gave me quite a joyful feeling as some new twist came into play and the world wrenched into a strange direction.” The Cultural Gutter

“Once the world sank in and permeated my mind, I couldn’t put the book down. Like all good books, it only got better as it progressed, all the way to the end.” GreenMan Review

“Buckell has done an excellent job with his first Sci-Fi novel. This story is complex, fresh, and interesting–and wide open to a sequel.” Children’s Literature

“An impressive debut…with unique creatures, characters, and advanced technology; Crystal Rain blends plenty of action, suspense, culture, and science fiction. Buckell has created an interesting world that I’m looking forward to reading more about in his sequel Ragamuffin.” SciFi Chick

“A galloping read that throws the reader into an alien world that they won’t want to leave. I may have just found my new favorite sci-fi author.” Graeme’s Fantasy Review

“This is an exciting and imaginative debut from author Tobias S. Buckell. The story features characters that are carefully nuanced and thus, wholly believable. The ending, though logical, is truly heartbreaking.” Bookstove

“What Tobias Buckell has done here is pretty impressive. He’s taken a culture that wouldn’t usually be put in the same sentence as science fiction and created something that is both unique and familiar.” – Walker of Worlds

05 Jan

For Locus subscribers, I have a summary of the Bermuda workshop in the latest issue

I penned a few words about the awesome folks I got to meet in Bermuda for the latest issue of Locus.

Bermuda

(Correction: Grace Jones = Grace Welch), I apologize for any confusion).

I’m hoping that with the ongoing workshop, and the stories, that soon editors in the field will start seeing submissions from them.

Or I’ll be giving them a long-distance side eye.

Because they were talented.

19 Dec

Confusion schedule

I’ll be a panelist at Confusion this January 16-18th. In addition to the panels and mass autograph session, I’m excited to be interviewing the GoH, Karen Lord, for anyone attending.

This’ll be great. I hope to see you all show up!

The schedule:

Friday 5pm: Gadgets and Apps for Writing
Scrivener, Evernote, writing books on phones and tablets!

Saturday 4pm: Mass Autograph Session

Sunday 10am: Post-Colonial SF
Can our world’s own colonization history help us write the stories of future colonizations? What were the pitfalls? And how can we avoid them? Or are we just doomed to repeat history…

Sunday 11am: Karen Lord interview
Best-selling author Tobias Buckell interviews our Author Guest of Honor Karen Lord

Sunday 12pm: Extreme Weather in Science Fiction
First the ice caps begin melting, and then we get Sharknado. How have real-world weather events influenced science fiction? Can we use science fictional ideas to solve our real-world environmental crises?

18 Dec

The Xenowealth novels are now available to non-US eBook readers

While I sort out the administrative stuff for the recently successful Kickstarter for Xenowealth: A Collection, I have another piece of exciting holiday news. I’ve been working really hard to get the eBooks of Crystal Rain and Ragamuffin up for the holiday season in non-US territories.

Buckell CrystalRain

They are available on Amazon in non-US, non-Canada, and non-Philippine areas (Tor owns the exclusive rights to the US, Canada and the Philippines on them). So for example, UK readers, here is Crystal Rain (it is actually popping up the steampunk top 100 list, so yay).

The bookstores that allow sales in that particular geographic region are Amazon, Kobo, and iTunes. So if you are outside the US, Canada, and the Philippines and look for the eBooks in either of those stores you should find them.

I am still learning Google Play.

So the books are now available in English, world wide.

Particularly of note to my Caribbean readers: you can now snag the Xenowealth eBooks easily as well.

Pricing is $2.99 for Crystal Rain, $3.99 for Ragamuffin, and $4.99 for Sly Mongoose and $4.99 for The Apocalypse Ocean.

Lastly, Sly Mongoose is going live on January 2nd. That’s my birthday. I wanted to celebrate it with a book launch.

But all three eBook outlets are set to take pre-orders.

09 Dec

Authors reading one star reviews

Have you been paying attention to the Worldbuilders charity that Pat Rothfuss runs? It’s up to $574,508 raised for Heifer International. One of the stretch goals was just blown right past (450K), in which I and many other cool writers read one star reviews of our work.

You can help out Heifer International via Worldbuilders here by just buying great signed books, or other cool items, as well as entering a lottery.

The next stretch goal is getting Hank Green to perform an angry acoustic of “Shake it Off.”

What’s that you say? You want to make the world a better place while winning fabulous prizes?

Well today is your lucky day.

Heifer International is our favorite charity. It helps people raise themselves up out of poverty and starvation. Heifer promotes education, sustainable agriculture, and local industry all over the world.

They don’t just keep kids from starving, they make it so families can take care of themselves. They give goats, sheep, and chickens to families so their children have milk to drink, warm clothes to wear, and eggs to eat.

(Are you ready? I’m so ready. Let’s do it.)

Pay attention now, you’ve got a couple different options for donating.

The Lottery

The Sure Thing

The Auctions

(Via How It Works | Worldbuilders.)

08 Dec

More on Kindle Unlimited

When I said half the stuff indie writers are now saying in the comments here about Amazon I was called some heinous names and ‘legacy’ writer, a ‘trad pub house slave’ and many other objectionable things. All I’ve done is note in the past that putting all your eggs in the Amazon basket will one day lead to sorrow.

Porter Anderson has a pretty thorough roundup over at theBookSeller.com:

Odd how those squeals of “this is the best time to be an author!” start to fade when you hear about a major self-publishing author’s struggles to pay a child’s medical bills because 75 percent of her Amazon income evaporated in the advent of KU, isn’t it?

Trial and so much error, obviously by Amazon’s folks — who are good people inventing a new  wheel — as well as by authors.

What comes next? We don’t know. As usual. 

That’s the bottom line: the way, the truth, and the lightheadedness of it all.. We just don’t know.

(Via Is the honeymoon over? KU comes between Amazon and its self-publishers | The Bookseller.)

There’s still a lot of sorting and settling out.

But we are the little insects under conglomerate giant’s feet. It’s not that I’m going to say other corporations are better. Just that I have a cynical eye toward them all! The idea peddled a few years ago that Amazon cared about writers and nothing but writers was silly then, and we’re starting to realize it.

Amazon cares about customers first, and gaining more of them… also first. Giving them free books for signing up to their service is a win for Amazon, even if it’s not a win for writers.

If that means at the writer’s cost, so be it. I warned about this with the cuts that were made in audio royalties, and the cuts made in certain foreign markets if you didn’t go Kindle Select. And even though I sold as a hybrid author, I was consistently attacked for pointing these moves out.

eBooks are a great option. I’m happy to see more arrows in the quiver.

But now we’re seeing the reality set in. There’s lots of work ahead of us. And the gold-rush mentality is fading. Which is a relief.

I’m not giving up on being a hybrid author, but I sure am making sure my books are for sale in multiple areas and in multiple ways.

08 Dec

They as a pronoun

I’ve noticed some reviews catch that I do my best to adopt they and them as a neutral pronoun. I’ve seen Zir and Ze around, but I’m not sure if that’ll take off. Them and they for a neutral works. Whether or not a character is gender neutral, I prefer to try to keep the character reference neutral. If the character’s gender is truly unknown, it seems fair.

It looks like it’s something younger generations are doing, and their teachers are trying to catch up:

As language catches up with culture, new pronouns have been invented to acknowledge gender-variant identities. Just as importantly, the gender-neutral plural pronoun “they” and its inflected forms, “them”, “their”, “themselves” (and “themself”!), are being used to refer to one person. To mark gender inclusivity, “they” has arrived at the party.

(Via ‘They’ has arrived at the pronoun party | Opinion | Times Higher Education.)

Though I’d submit in SF/F and other circles questions about non-gendered pronouns have been floating around a while.

addendum: Good point by David Thomas Moore on twitter:

08 Dec

Reminder: How to Get Signed and Personalized Tobias S. Buckell Books for the Holidays, 2014

I’m bumping this back up, reminder, you have until the 10th (that’s Wednesday) to snag signed books for the holidays if you want them:

Winter’s coming! Which means we’ll soon be shopping for gifts for each other and doing our best, if we’re too far away from the equator, to keep coldwarm. And there’s nothing better than sitting inside a warm home with a book, right?

At John Scalzi’s excellent suggestion (he’s been doing this a few years), I’m teaming up with Jay & Mary’s Book Center, the closest independent bookseller to me, to offer signed and personalized books. You can get a great gift and support a independent book store, which is a double win.

How to do it?

1. Ring up Jay & Mary’s Book Center, via their 800 number (800-842-1604) and explain that you want to order signed copies of my books. And they’ve asked that everyone please call rather than send email, as they find it easier to keep track that way.

2. Tell them what books you’d like and whether you want it just plainly signed by me, or if you’d like me to sign it to a specific name (great for gifts), and if there’s something specific you’d like me to write in the book. Do remember to make it clear if you’re ordering the book as a gift who’s name the book is being signed to. If it’s unclear to me, I’ll avoid using a specific name.

3. You don’t have to order just my books. For example, John Scalzi will be in to sign books at Jay & Mary. You could get *two* New York Times Bestelling authors signing your books at once.

4. Give Jay & Mary your mailing address and billing info. This is open to US Residents only, alas, due to shipping issues.

5. After that, I’ll be swinging by Jay & Mary’s to sign the books for you!

If you want the books by Christmas, the deadline for that is December 10th in order to make sure they get to you!

Here are the books of mine that are available:

Current Hardcover: Hurricane Fever.

Paperback: Arctic Rising. The Xenowealth novels Crystal Rain, Ragamuffin, and Sly Mongoose may still have some warehouses holding them, the best thing to do is ask and find out. As the trade paperbacks are coming out this January, they may be harder to order this season around.

Anthologies I’m in: Upgraded, Dead Man’s Hand, The Book of Silverberg (you’re free to ask about others, but again I wouldn’t be sure about their availability).

Good luck shopping, and thanks so much for supporting Jay & Mary’s Book Center,. When John took me over to show me the store I was excited to realize there was an independent I could do this with (and pick up a couple books from while I was there). They seem like a great store, and I’m thrilled to be working with them.

Best!

06 Dec

Kindle Unlimited may be cannibilizing eBook sales. I’m unsurprised

Amazon is disintermediating general eBook sales with Kindle Unlimited:

When Kindle Unlimited launched in July, it was hoped that the increase in fees paid for loans would counteract the loss in income from authors not being able to sell their ebooks outside of the Kindle Store.

Sadly, a lot of authors are reporting that that is not the case.

(Via Author discontent grows as Kindle Unlimited enters its fifth month – The Digital Reader.)

Expect impacts due to Oyster and its like as well. For a canary in the coal mine, check out singer/songwriters/musicians and the Spotify effect.

So if you’re exempt from Kindle Universe exclusivity (as certain Amazon boosters are, because they’re used as figureheads), it’s a good gig.

Everyone else is in a different spot. And as I’ve been saying for years, if you depend on one marketplace or avenue, you’re effectively non-diversified and you’re at risk if a business model changes.

I’m happy to diversify into Kindle (I have some new stuff coming out over the next quarter), but it’s one avenue of income among many.

The best thing you can do is Courtney Milan’s advice to make sure you built up a great email list serv of people interested in your next book.

Why?

Consider your current career as just one variation on many you’ll experience. Assume that algorithms will change. That tastes will change. Things will shift. Empires grow and die.

A mailing list of fans?

Doesn’t matter if you use Kindle, direct brain-to-brain interface, burst into scripts, or start serializing on your blog for Patreon subscriptions, if you have a growing list of subscribers you’ll always be able to reach them.

Facebook changed how you could reach the people you’d gathered up as an audience. Twitter might as well.

Control your own website and mailing list (physical too, they’re still A Thing), and always think of distribution as a business partner matter, not a matter of revolution or what tribe you’re a member of, and these swings will come as less a surprise and more of just part of the constant shifting that is trying to make a living as an artist or trying to reach many people as an artist.

Because no matter how you do that, it’s actually way harder than it looks.

If it wasn’t everyone else would be doing it, right?

04 Dec

Xenowealth: A Collection Kickstarter is halfway through. Some quick thoughts.

As of today we’re just over the halfway mark on my Kickstarter for Xenowealth: A Collection. I promised I’d burn some social capitol promoting this, but Thanksgiving break and holidays hit at the halfway point as well, so I’ve just been letting things go quiet.

When I built this Kickstarter out, I wanted to tweak some of the things I’d done in the past. For one, in the past I’d put the eBooks at too high a value. Lowering them to $10 seems to have boosted our numbers, and included some drive-by backers who aren’t already part of my core readership. So that worked.

I noticed from some other Kickstarters that a decent tranche of trade paperback backers existed. I’d shied away as that being ‘more logistics’ in the past. But I think I was wrong. It fills in a ~$30 backing level. There’s a logical $10 eBook, $30 trade and $50 hardcover set of steps.

I’m noticing my higher ones aren’t as popular though, so while I nailed the lower ones, I’m having trouble with those. But I can’t call it a failed test until the very end. We shall see.

The $30 trade level also offers a great transition into the post-Kickstarter selling. Get a trade paperback ready to sell via CreateSpace, because if you have the rights, you should do that anyway. It’s something I’ve been meaning to do for The Apocalypse Ocean, Mitigated Futures, and I haven’t. Putting in there will make me do it. While the limited hardcover will be limited, the trade allows me sell physical books.

People still really like those. I need to test those waters out more than I currently do.

I need to put out a call for artists soon. That’ll be fun to have some of the stories illustrated.

As far as progress so far, I’m happy. People asked why I set the goal so low at $1,000. As Mitigated Futures hit $3,280 (and a last minute backer came in the next day to push it to $4,280 and commission a custom story), I had a feeling we could get to $4,000 or so. I set up stretch goals all the way through $10,000, trying to make sure to keep the project interesting. And because, hey, a guy can dream, right?

That said, I wasn’t expecting the first day to go so well. To be at $5,220 here halfway through is amazing. Lots of Xenowealth fans out there.

I am questioning whether I should have set a $6,000 stretch goal with the third novella there, instead of putting it in with the $7,500 omnibus. Maybe that would have kept some excitement during the slower bits here in week 3.

But week 4 always picks back up.

I have no idea where this is going to end, but it’s been quite a ride so far.

Thanks all for the signal boosts and enthusiasm. Short story collections get the short shrift often enough in an author’s career. They’re a hard sell. It’s interesting to see that crowdfunding opens up a space here for me to do these in a way where everyone wins.

When I talked at O’Reilly Tools of Change about crowdfunding I mentioned that Kevin Kelly’s ‘1,000 true fans’ concept could be used to do interesting things even at smaller levels. 169 readers made Mitigated Futures a great project, 191 gave me the space to write The Apocalypse Ocean. 192 are on board for the Xenowealth collection. The next 13 days should be interesting!

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