Over at BN Review, Paul Di Filippo looks at The Apocalypse Ocean… and likes what he sees:

The Apocalypse Ocean, I’m happy to say, starts off at a gallop, never slows down, and is completely up to the high caliber of its predecessors: a big, thought-provoking entertainment. It conducts a localized adventure with zip and zest, while also opening up the Xenowealth universe to larger consequences. Its appearance is a vindication of all of the faith of Buckell’s fans, and the author’s own determination.

I also liked this bit:

Buckell’s short, punchy chapters conspire with his fluid prose and deftly intruded speculative conceits to create a state-of-the-art SF narrative. He devotes equal amounts of time to the complicated human dynamics among his variously psychically damaged protagonists (the back-story detour for Kay is very well done), and to the kind of near-Singularity events (think Stephen Baxter or Greg Egan) beyond their immediate ken, but so dangerously relevant. Harking back to such illustrious predecessors as Jack Vance (The Dragon Masters) and Karl Schroeder (Ventus), Buckell builds both a microcosmically grounded planetary romance and a macrocosmically lofty galactic milieu.